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Hound’s Bite-Cover Reveal/Excerpt/Giveaway

I am excited to reveal the cover for HOUND’S BITE, the fifth full-length novel in the Ivy Granger urban fantasy series by E.J. Stevens.  We also have a giveaway and a sneak peek book excerpt to share!

Cover Reveal: Hound’s Bite

 

Hound's Bite Ivy Granger urban fantasy by E.J. Stevens

 

Hound’s Bite (Ivy Granger, Psychic Detective #5) by E.J. Stevens

Ivy Granger thought she left the worst of Mab’s creations behind
when she escaped Faerie.  She thought wrong.

In a cruel twist of fate, Ivy has unleashed a powerful horde of
Unseelie beasts upon her city, turning her homecoming into a
potential slaughter of innocents.  Now Ivy must gather her allies to
fight a reputedly unstoppable force—The Wild Hunt.

Will the training Ivy received in her father’s court be enough to
save her city, or will Harborsmouth be forced to kneel before the
Lord of the Hunt?  She is willing risk her own life, but some
sacrifices come at a cost worse than death.  When an ally is bitten
by one of The Wild Hunt’s hounds, Ivy must face the possibility that
winning this battle may mean killing the one person she has come to
love most.

Release Date: July 12, 2016

Genre: Paranormal, Urban Fantasy

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Hound’s Bite Book Excerpt

“Are you saying we should run?” I asked, eyebrows raised.  “Because you should know me better than that.”

“What he’s saying, Princess is that you woke up something too big for the three of us to defeat alone,” Torn said.

That made me pause.  We’d fought faerie queens, pyro demons, a
lovesick necromancer, and a psychotic lamia, to name a few.  I may not
have come through those battles unscathed, or with all my guts still on
the inside, but with my friends at my side, and a new arsenal of wisp
powers at my fingertips, I felt nearly invincible.

I looked to Ceff, hoping he’d grab his trident and join me for some
quick monster cleanup.  I may not be on the clock for this one, but I
didn’t let hungry fae prowl the streets of Harborsmouth.  And if Torn
was right, I’d somehow let this one follow us out of Faerie.  No way was
I turning tail, no matter how tired I was.

But Ceff didn’t reach for his weapons.

“We need allies,” he said.

“And larger weapons,” Torn said, with a wink.

The cat sidhe looked excited, which was a clue that I wasn’t going to like the answer to my next question.

“And what monster do we need to gather our allies and weapons against?” I asked.

“Haven’t you guessed yet, Princess?” Torn asked, eyes gleaming.  “We’re not just facing one howling beast.”

Ceff turned to me, closing the space between us.  In the moonlight,
I could see my reflection in the dark pools of his kelpie eyes—eyes
that were tight with worry.

“What are they?” I asked.

Ceff’s voice was low and reverent, and tinged with the taint of fear.

“The Wild Hunt.”

Hound’s Bite Cover Reveal Giveaway

To celebrate the Hound’s Bite cover reveal, we are giving away a $10 Amazon Gift Card!

Win $10 Amazon Gift Card

To enter, please use the Rafflecopter form below.  This giveaway is INTERNATIONAL.  Giveaway ends February 23, 2016 midnight EST.

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What do you think of the cover?

E.J. Stevens is the author of 14 works of speculative fiction, including the Hunters’ Guild urban fantasy series, the Spirit Guide young adult paranormal series, and the award-winning Ivy Granger urban fantasy series.  She is known for filling pages with quirky
characters, bloodsucking vampires, psychotic faeries, and snarky,
kick-butt heroines.

Connect with E.J. Stevens by following her on Twitter, Facebook, Newsletter, Blog, Goodreads, and Amazon.

My Thing For Dwarves-Guest Post by D.P. Prior

My Thing For Dwarves-Guest Post by D.P. Prior

MY THING FOR DWARVES

 by D.P. Prior

 (editor, old school vaudeville strongman, and author of the new series,

Legends of the Nameless Dwarf)

 Dwarves in fantasy may be dour, beer-swilling, gold-digging troglodytes, but there’s no doubt about their importance in myth and folklore. In the Prose Edda, four dwarves (Norori, Suori, Austri, and Vestri) hold up the sky, and there’s even some scholarly speculation that the little folk may have had a hand in the creation of the first humans, Ask and Embla.

 The word “dwarf” (Old English dweorg, Old Norse dvergr) has been linked to the Indo-European root dreugh, which gives us the English “dream” and “trug” (deception), which has important ramifications for the dwarves of my own fantasy world of Aethir.

 Dwarves have been around in popular culture for as long as I can remember (my longterm memory is significantly better than my short, which probably has something to do with my dwarven love of anything that can be drunk from a flagon). The Brothers Grimm recorded the folk tale of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves as long ago as 1812. Tolkien gave us an ensemble of silly-hat-wearing dwarves in The Hobbit (1937), and Terry Gilliam’s Time Bandits (1981) had a band of chronologically challenged, diminutive treasure-seekers doing battle with evil.

 Dwarves are often associated with the deep places of the earth. It’s a connection that goes back to the Eddas and is a characteristic of the dwarves of Tolkien’s Middle Earth. In my own universe, the dwarves of Aethir are “created” by the scientist Sektis Gandaw in order to mine the precious ore, scarolite. However, there are darker and older secrets to their nature waiting to be discovered.

 I was always quite ambivalent towards Thorin Oakenshield and his companions in The Hobbit— they are often avaricious to the point of foolhardiness, although it would be hard to deny their bravery. Gimli, in The Lord of the Rings, is perhaps more likable, particularly in his score-keeping scene with Legolas at Helm’s Deep, and his hardiness in the epic battle in the mines of Moria, the quintessential dwarven environment.

 Something of a dwarf stereotype has developed over the years. Some of it comes from mythology, some from Tolkien’s feasting and drinking dwarves, and much from the development of the race in Dungeons and Dragons and Warhammer. Despite their often bellicose natures, dwarves tend to provide a touch of grouchy comedy to fantasy tales—“Nobody tosses a dwarf,” says John Rhys-Davies’s Gimli in the Peter Jackson film.

 Various subtypes of dwarf have arisen, numerous clans, but there is almost always an immediately identifiable quality of dwarfishness about them. Generally it’s alcohol, although dwarves are also very much bound up with axes, stoicism, and a love of shiny objects that have to be dug out of rock.

 I don’t know if it’s just me, but dwarves often have a flavour of Scottishness about them, so much so that a RPG figure I once painted for the Nameless Dwarf had tartan britches. Arguably, the trend was taken too far in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit, but it’s been a staple of the Warhammer universe, perhaps epitomized by the character Gotrek. Someone once stated they felt the Nameless Dwarf was another Gotrek type. The funny thing is, the Nameless Dwarf has been around since 1979 (when there was no Warhammer), which means he predates Gotrek by nearly two decades.

 Back in the days when I belonged to the legendary Wargaming Society sequestered away at the back of the Archery recreation ground’s public toilets, I was in the unsavoury habit of playing Dungeons and Dragons with a crabby bunch of ne’er-do-wells. We had the back room of the club (the front was for serious gamers in the Napoleonics tradition). We painted the walls and ceiling black, let the cobwebs grow, and gathered around an enormous (black) table with six-packs of Jacob’s Club biscuits for endless campaigns that took us all the way to the Abyss and back.

 There were a few memorable dwarves among the players. One was particularly annoying (I forget his name). He was literally dripping with artifacts, was as indestructible as the Hulk, and had the “my axe is bigger than yours” personality type. The shogger had even been resurrected a couple of times. He just refused to go away. He did go away, eventually, though, when he took a pop at a certain dwarf with no name, who always had the luck of the gods on his side. Chopped the bleeder’s head off, and that was an end to the matter.

 Another player had a fat dwarf, aptly named Falstaff, but all I can remember of him is that he was always lagging behind so he could hit on the party’s only female (an elf of all things!)

 I pretty much always played dwarves. I tried other races, but the minute those characters were killed (and inevitably they were) I got straight back into my comfort zone.

 When my brother decided to DM a particular nasty orc-fest at the club, a super-party was assembled, and I realized I was going to need a pretty special dwarf to get the job done.

 That’s when the original Nameless Dwarf was created. He was nameless back then because he didn’t need any sort of personality. He was a tank, a hack-and-slash superhero. He was the dwarven Terminator (even before Arnold had first uttered “I’ll be back.”) Some time after his creation, I bought a miniature figure called The Dwarf with No Name—a cigar-smoking, gun-toting, poncho-wearing dwarf based on the Clint Eastwood character. It wasn’t quite appropriate for Nameless, but it was a cool figure nonetheless.

 Over the years, the character developed, but he also grew more and more powerful, and that’s never a good thing in gaming. Eventually, I retired him. Years later, I reinvented him, but that was when I learned the hard truth that roleplaying games are for people less imaginatively and cognitively challenged than an old codger like me. I shoved my polyhedral dice in the attic and left Nameless to the Void.

 Many years later, I gave him a cameo in my first fantasy novel, The Resurrection of Deacon Shader. Back then I was into being terribly, terribly literary and reducing all my characters to two-dimensional talking heads. I did the same with Nameless, although a lot of readers were impressed with his first appearance. With barely a word spoken, he scares the crap out of the hero, Shader, displaying some of that elemental violence he’d had as a D&D character.

 When I was staying in Chicago a few years ago I found myself at a loose end while my son was out catching frogs. I sat at a friend’s dining room table and resolved to write a Nameless short story to sell to a magazine. I wrote the 5000 word The Ant-Man of Malfen in one sitting and liked where the character was going. He had elements of Shakespeare’s Falstaff (Henry IV 1&2), Hilaire Belloc’s drinking, singing, and camaraderie, a crippling manic depression, and a smattering of David Gemmell’s Druss the Legend.

 Nameless has some of those stereotypical dwarven characteristics—the axe and the grog, but he’s also a rather unique, complex character who (importantly for me) has some surprising vulnerabilities.

 The story was accepted by Pulp Empire, but then I went on to expand it into a novella. It starts after the Nameless, under the influence of a malevolent black axe, virtually commits genocide. The survivors of his massacre in the ravine city of Arx Gravis flee across the mountains into the nightmare lands of Qlippoth. At last free from the axe, Nameless desperately wants to find them before it’s too late (no one comes back from Qlippoth). He hires Nils Fargin, son of a criminal guildmaster, to lead him to some rather shady contacts who may be able to help.

 That’s where the Chronicles of the Nameless Dwarf start—a guilt-ridden Nameless trying to find the survivors of his race, and knowing he’s the last person they’d want to run into. The series spans five books that take him on a journey with modest Sword and Sorcery beginnings to a truly epic conclusion.

The Nameless Dwarf books have benefited enormously from some great artwork. The first cover was produced by C.S. Marks. Subsequent covers in the first series were painted by Patrick Stacey. Russian artist Anton Kokarev came up with the iconic image of Nameless for the cover of the Complete Chronicles, which has consistently been my bestselling book, and has topped the fantasy charts on several occasions. More recently, Mike Nash, a brilliant English artist, accepted the challenge of producing covers for Carnifex (Legends of the Nameless Dwarf Book 1) and Return of the Dwarf Lords (Book 4).

 The Nameless Dwarf books began as a fun spinoff from the Shader series, which is much heavier epic fantasy. Something of Nameless’s old D&D luck must still linger, though, as the Chronicles have easily outsold all my other books put together. Either that, or it’s just a reminder that the little guys, in spite of all their vices, remain as popular today as they were in the days of yore.

 In 2015, I began work on a follow up Nameless Dwarf story, Return of the Dwarf Lords. Based on this, I was asked by my agent to put together a complete Nameless Dwarf story arc, and so I sat down to write the tragic origins story, Carnifex, and then put together Geas of the Black Axe from some material that originally featured in my Shader series, massively revised and told from Nameless’s perspective, along with approximately 60,000 of new material. Next, The Complete Chronicles were fully revised and became book 3: Revenge of the Lich.

 The new books were released in January 2016. You can find out all about them at:

www.dpprior.com

  CARNIFEX

LEGENDS OF THE NAMELESS DWARF BOOK 1

 For more than a thousand years, the dwarves have hidden away from the world in their ravine city of Arx Gravis.

 Governed by an inflexible council whose sole aim is to avoid the errors of the past, the defining virtue of their society is that nothing should ever change.

 But when the Scriptorium is broken into, and Ravine Guard Carnifex Thane sees a homunculus fleeing the scene of the crime, events are set in motion that will ensure nothing will ever be the same again.

 Deception and death are coming to Arx Gravis.

The riddles that preceded Carnifex’s birth crystalize into a horrifying fate that inexorably closes in.

 But it is in blood that legends are born, and redemption is sometimes seeded in the gravest of sins.

 For Carnifex is destined to become the Ravine Butcher, before even that grim appellation is forever lost, along with everything that once defined him.

Carnifex - Full

The Magician Cover Reveal

Cover Reveal: The Magician

 

The Magician Dark Arcana fantasy by E.J. Stevens

 

The Magician (Dark Arcana #1) by E.J. Stevens

When members of tarot’s Major Arcana begin manifesting in the mortal
world, magic is in the air and change is in the cards.

Release Date: September 20, 2016

Genre: Fantasy, Paranormal, Urban Fantasy

Add to Goodreads.

The Magician Cover Reveal Giveaway

To celebrate The Magician’s cover reveal, we are giving away a signed cover art postcard and a $10 Amazon Gift Card!

Win $10 Amazon Gift Card

To enter, please use the Rafflecopter form below.  This giveaway is INTERNATIONAL.  Giveaway ends February 2, 2016 midnight EST.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

E.J. Stevens is the author of 14 works of speculative fiction,
including the Hunters’ Guild urban fantasy series, the Spirit Guide
young adult paranormal series, and the award-winning Ivy Granger urban
fantasy series.  She is known for filling pages with quirky
characters, bloodsucking vampires, psychotic faeries, and snarky,
kick-butt heroines.

Connect with E.J. Stevens by following her on Twitter, Facebook, Newsletter, Blog, Goodreads, and Amazon.

Shadow Sight Review


I met this awesome writer at
ARC-NOLA and her books are right down my alley. My favorite genre is Urban
Fantasy and the supes that she has in the Ivy Granger series are Fae which is one
of my favorites.
First of all, I loved this book. It
drew me in quite quickly. Psychometry is one gift you don’t see written very
often. Ivy is a bit mellow at the start, I prefer to see a little more kick ass
heroine but I think this is mainly the fleshing of her character. The twist of
romance was a welcome addition and I hope to see the relationship grow further.
I’d also like to see some more back story on Ivy’s father. Action and romance
blend wonderfully with the story line. Excellent starting point.
Her take on the Fae is exactly how I
see them, not all are glittery TinkerBell types. This book does portray their
inhuman nature and there is some humanization but not too much to turn me off.
The plot line flows nicely and is a
good beginning to Ivy Granger saga.  Some
of the pop culture references are very relatable to me and what my interests
are.
If you like the Fae and like to see
the darker side of Faekind, pick up this book and enjoy the action and romance
that snakes throughout the book.
Looking forward to the rest of the
books in the series.
I’m giving this book a 4 Fairy rating
for the action filled Fae adventure with a twist of romance.

 CHECK OUT E.J. STEVENS AT THE FOLLOWING SOCIAL MEDIA SITES:

Ghost Light Review

BUY FROM AMAZON
Welcome to the 2nd installment of the Ivy Granger
series.
Where the 1st book was more of a fleshing out of
the main characters, this book continues on with more depth and Ivy becomes the
kick ass heroine that I love to read about.
You also get to see Jinx, her trusty sidekick, blossom some
more.
I also like the fact that more supernatural characters show
up in this book. Lamia, faerie queens, demons, and many others. Some of the
visitors aren’t written about very often and it’s nice to see some new players on
the field.
Ivy has found out the seriousness of faerie bargains and
what happens when you are half fae and aren’t in control of your powers.
In this book, she starts the quest to find the one person
who can help her control her wisp powers and gets thrown into the frying pan.
I also enjoyed the continuation of the romance between Ivy
and Ceff.
I give Ghost Light my
5 Fairies rating for continuing action with some lightheartedness thrown
in the mix.  I couldn’t put the book down
once I started reading it and read it in about 3 days.
EJ Stevens is becoming one of my favorite authors and I am looking
forward to the next books in the series.
 CHECK OUT E.J. STEVENS AT THE FOLLOWING SOCIAL MEDIA SITES:

Burning Bright Review

I just finished reading the 3rd installment of
the Ivy Granger series and this book does not disappoint.
I again found myself immersed into Ivy’s world and didn’t
want it to end.
Every book takes you a little deeper into Ivy’s character
and shows how she grows into a phenomal kick ass heroine.
Her half human nature allows her to show compassion and
moves her away from the inhumanness of the Fae world.
Her maternal nature shows itself in her ragtag adopted companions,
one being a troll child and the other one a rare demon child.
I can’t help but smile and feel warm and fuzzy about Ivy and
Ceff’s relationship and enjoy seeing it blossom into something more.
When Ivy’s sidekick and best friend Jinx gets in a spot of
trouble, Ivy rushes to the rescue and puts her friends before her personal
quest to find her cursed father who can help her control her wisp powers.
A few twists and turns keep your turning the page and you
can’t help but root for the underdog.
I am already starting to read the 4th installment
and anticipate I’ll have that one done in about 3 days as well.
If you are interested in a half human heroine’s story with
some paranormal romance thrown in there, don’t hesitate to pick up your copy
today.
I’m giving this installment my 5 fairy rating because of the
journey into Ivy’s world where you are led on a wondrous quest of
self-discovery and how one half human half fae woman learns about her inner
strength.
 CHECK OUT E.J. STEVENS AT THE FOLLOWING SOCIAL MEDIA SITES:

FRACTURED SOUL BLOG TOUR-AUTHOR INTERVIEW & GIVEAWAY

Rachel McClellan

Llona will do whatever it takes to protect her new found friends and home, but the dark plot threatening Lucent Academy, a school that’s supposed to be a safe place for Auras, may be too powerful for even Llona to defeat. This fast-paced tale of love, loyalty, and overcoming the darkness will keep you on the edge of your seat until the last page!


CEDAR FORT HAS BEEN GRACIOUS TO THEIR READERS AND IS GIVING AWAY AN E-COPY OF FRACTURED SOUL. TO ENTER, FILL OUT THE RAFFLECOPTER BELOW


What/who inspired you to become a writer??
I’ve always enjoyed writing and wrote all the time, but I never believed I could become an author. Honestly, I didn’t think I was good enough, but then a trip to Ireland changed everything. Something there helped me grow a pair of ovaries to just go for it. So I guess you could say Ireland inspired me.

Do you have a favorite genre of book that you like to read/write? If so, why??
I love anything related to the supernatural: urban fantasy, paranormal, horror, etc. Life can be incredibly hard so I like “escaping” to worlds were good triumphs over evil, where a normal person can suddenly be the most important person in the world, where our imagination is pushed to the limits and on and on.

What helping aids do you use to focus when you write? Music?? Nature???
Two things are a must have: Music (dark, moody stuff) and my Alphasmart which is keyboard with four lines of visible text at the top. These two items go everywhere with me.

What character(s) of your book, Fractured Soul do you relate to the most??
Llona and Liam. I want to be the best possible person I can be, but there are times when it’s hard to keep fighting, keep putting on a brave face when you’re struggling inside. I was recently diagnosed with MS so this has come to mean a lot more to me.

What words of wisdom would you like to share with aspiring writers like myself?
If writing really is a passion, you must research everything about it. Stalk agents blogs, study other author’s novels, read books on writing, and encourage, even seek out, criticism of your work. It’s the only way you’ll get better.

How do you visualize your stories?? In pictures?? Conversations? Dreams?
They come to me in pictures, the exact way I’d see them as if on a movie screen. That’s why I like using the Alphasmart. With so few lines of visible text, it prevents me from being tempted to edit as I go. I can write as fast as my fingers can type.

What are your writing goals for the next 5 years??
I want at least one book a year published, which means I need to write a lot. I’d even like to get into screenwriting.

How long did it take you to write Fractured Soul? What/who inspired these books??
It took about six months and then another three to edit it. What inspired me to write this series? I wanted to write something different. I thought of all the supernatural beasties that “exist” in our world. As the little wheels in my brain turned, I thought it would be cool to have a girl who could use light as a power. Then when I overheard someone talking about the aura’s surrounding a person, I sort of put the two together. Just like peanut butter and chocolate, it turned pretty good.

If you could have dinner with someone dead or alive, famous or not famous, who would it be and why??
My great, great and so on, great aunt was Mary Surratt, the first woman legally hung in the USA for her role as a conspirator in Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. She always claimed she was innocent as did a few others. I’d like to know the truth.

Let’s do something fun…write something about each of the next 10 words in 10 words or less.

Movement
What’s involved with my CrossFit workouts.

Fantasy
Hugh Jackman.

Chaos
When all my kids get home from school.

Energy

Bleh.

Balance
Something I’m always striving for.

Synchronicity
A very beautiful word.

Imagination
The most important thing that helps me write.

Invention
Tampons rock.

Freedom
Date night. Or using the bathroom.

Intelligence
Something I used to have before four kids.

If you found yourself on a deserted island, what 10 things would you take and why?
A yacht so I can get off when I feel like my kids might need me.
A TV so I don’t miss any of my favorite shows.
My mattress because I want to be comfortable.
A dirtbike because, um, yeah, so fun.
An Olive Garden so I will always have good food.
My husband so I don’t get “frustrated”.
An Alphasmart so I can still write.
A metal detector so I can find the buried treasure.
Prozac in case I start going all “Lord of the Flies”
A full tool chest so my husband won’t be bored, or more like so he can build me a sweet home.

How do you write your books?? Are you by the seat of your pants writer or do you plot out your books in advance??
A combination of both. I always know the ending before I start any novel. Then from there I’ll plan out the next few scenes ahead of time, but that’s as far as I go when it comes to organization.

And last by not least, if you could time travel what period of the history of future would you go to??
I love the beauty of the Downtown Abbey times, but I’d get bored and would be pissed that I couldn’t do dude stuff and have wild adventures. That’s why I like right now. As a woman, I’m not limited to what I can do and experience. I hope it’s still that way in the future, but since I have no way of knowing, I wouldn’t want to go there.

Feel free to any other interesting tidbits about yourself 🙂 Please include your social media links.

Author Bio
Rachel McClellan was born and raised in Idaho, a place secretly known for its supernatural creatures. When she’s not in her writing lair, she’s partying with her husband and four crazy, yet lovable, children. Rachel’s love for storytelling began as a child when the moon first possessed the night. For when the lights went out, her imagination painted a whole new world. And what a scary world it was…

Find Rachel

Facebook  |  Blog   |  Website   |   Twitter   |  Goodreads  |  Book Trailer

Buy Fractured Light

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Buy Fractured Soul

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